Mincemeat Tart (Vegetarian)

mincemeat tart

Mincemeat pie gets a bad rap; I think the name doesn’t help it out any. However, it’s a long held Thanksgiving tradition for my family. My dad would be heartbroken if it weren’t on the menu. Back in the day I would assist my mom in baking that pie, which usually consisted of snapping open the can of mincemeat, lopping it into a prepared piecrust and cooking until bubbly and brown — ok, maybe I can see where that bad rap comes from.

thanksgiving recipes

I stand here today a little bit older and a little more discriminating asking you to give mincemeat a try. This homemade version in particular is worthy of praise, and even though it may go against tradition, there is nary a morsel of meat or even bullion in the mix. Fresh and dried fruit, nuts, brandy, honey and good pinch of salt make for a super flavorful pie.

fresh mincemeat pie

Every year, we serve mincemeat, apple and pumpkin pie after Thanksgiving dinner. If you want to taste something truly delicious — serve up a slice of mincemeat, pumpkin and whipped cream. What the pumpkin lacks in texture and flavor the mincemeat makes up in crunch and zip. I dip my fork into a little pumpkin, a little whipped cream and a little mincemeat and it’s a beautiful turkey day union on a fork.

mincemeat

This is my first time writing down my recipe that I’ve been making for years. Perhaps you’ll take a leap of faith and add it to your holiday table. I made it as a tart here, but feel free to make it as a pie. I’ve provided a tart crust that I love or you can use Elizabeth’s Perfect Pie Crust recipe.

mincemeat tart

thanksgiving

 

Mincemeat Tart

Makes one tart or pie

 

Filling: 

½ cup currants

½ cup golden raisins

¼  cup dried figs (Turkish Smyrian)

1 Granny Smith apple, small dice

1 Pink Lady apple, small dice

1 cup walnuts, toasted and chopped

3 tablespoons freshly squeezed orange juice

3 tablespoons brandy

2 tablespoons honey

1 tsp vanilla

1 ½ teaspoon cinnamon

¼ tsp clove

½ teaspoon kosher salt

Mix all the ingredients together and cover.  Place in fridge for two hours and then get to work making and chilling your tart crust.

 

Tart Crust and Assembly

Makes one top and bottom

This pastry is so versatile and bakes up beautifully, both in a free form tart – like a galette or to use for the tart pans with the removable bottom.  Elizabeth taught me this technique and it makes working with pie dough so easy.

1 ½ sticks of butter, cut in small cubes and then placed in the freezer

2 ½ cups of flour

¼ tablespoon sugar

½ teaspoon salt

½ cup ice water

1 egg yolk

Sanding sugar

Add the flour, sugar, and salt to a food processor fitted with a steel blade and pulse 5 times to incorporate. Add the butter and pulse 5 times. Next add the water and pulse about 10 times to incorporate. Shake the machine (if you can) to move the mixture around in the bowl of the processor (do not over-mix). It should look mealy but not come together in a ball.

Lay out two large sheets of plastic wrap and divide the dough into piles on each– I usually make on slightly larger to fully cover the bottom tart. The dough will be loose and grainy, but if you squeeze it together with your fingertips, it should come together easily.

Moving quickly, slide your hands under the plastic wrap, then squeeze and press the mixture together. Then rotate the plastic wrap 90 degrees and do it again. Continue to work the dough until it comes together in one piece, pressing it together about 5 times (be careful not to overwork the dough). Then fold the plastic over the dough so it seals the dough in, kind of like you’re wrapping a present.

Using your rolling pin, roll over the dough in the plastic wrap to flatten and form it into disks. You will see coin-sized butter marks in the dough and that is what you want. Those butter pieces will keep the crust flaky. Also, keeping the dough in the freezer or fridge after rolling and shaping keeps it flaky as well. Refrigerate the dough for 30 minutes to two hours.

Preheat oven 375 degrees

After the dough has chilled, remove the larger of the two disks and roll it out on a cool, lightly floured surface into the desired shape. I fold any edges over so the crust has a nice edge. After you have it shaped into the pan prick the bottom with a fork and place the prepared tart crust back in the freezer while you roll out the top. Grab the remaining disk in the fridge and roll that out for the top.  Pull the tart crust back out of the freezer and pour the mincemeat in evenly into the pie.  Place the dough top and press the top onto the sides so that the top of the bottom crust and the top of the top crust become one.  Make desired design of vent holes on the top and place on a cookie sheet.

Beat the egg yolk and bush over the top of the crust.  Sprinkle about 2 teaspoons of sanding sugar or raw sugar over the top and bake 30 minutes then turn 180 degrees and bake an additional 20 -25 minutes.

Serve with whipped cream.

mincemeat

tart dough

mincemeat tart

mincemeat recipe

thanksgiving

Share This

Facebook Google+ Twitter Pinterest E-mail



11 thoughts on “Mincemeat Tart (Vegetarian)”

Beautiful photos! I love hearing about ones Thanksgiving food traditions! Our son has been taken off of dairy, gluten, nuts, and corn so I’m already missing ours. Enjoy!

Mincemeat pie was something my father also always looked for on the Thanksgiving table – it was his favorite, along with the sparkling burgundy he always served with the turkey. Because of him I have always loved mincemeat pie and look forward to making your delicious looking version this year. Thanks for triggering the memories.

Only you could make me want to jump up and make a mincemeat pie RIGHT NOW! 😉 I will def add this in this year! FYI heading out to store for ingredients to make the tuna dip! Perfect call for a neighborhood get together this Sunday! Thanks Val!

I didn’t realize how healthy minced meat was. Is there a way to make the crust with less butter and a 100% whole grain or other substitute for white flour? I recently tried to make corn bread with coconut flour and corn flour and ruined it. I would like to find a way to make this more than a yearly treat.:)
Par

You brought back the wonderful memories of making up mincemeat with my mom. Christmas baking was a yearly tradition starting with our own mincemeat and fruitcake in September and finishing off with family favourites like individual mincemeat tarts and sugar cookies the week before the holidays. Thank you.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *